Volkswagen has unveiled its newest electric supercar – the Volkswagen I.D. R Pikes Peak, a one-off electric supercar designed to challenge for the electric honours of this year’s Pikes Peak challenge in Colorado Springs. The existing record is 8 minutes 57.118 seconds over the steeply climbing course. Volkswagen believe their car that can do the standing 100 km/h in 2.25 seconds is up to the challenge.

“Volkswagen’s goal is to reach the pinnacle of electromobility with the I.D. family. As such, Volkswagen’s involvement on Pikes Peak not only sets the trend for our future in motorsport, but is also of great symbolic significance in the truest sense,” said Volkswagen Member of the Board of Management with responsibility for Development, Dr. Frank Welsch. “Customers have always benefitted from the findings made in motorsport, and we expect to take these findings and use them as a valuable impetus for the development of future I.D. models. The hill climb on Pikes Peak will definitely be a real acid test for the electric drive.”

“The car looks fantastic and has already been attracting a lot of interest from the media and on social media channels for a few weeks,” said Jürgen Stackmann, Member of the Board of Management of the Volkswagen Passenger Cars brand with responsibility for ‘Sales, Marketing and After Sales’. “This project shows once again that Volkswagen is on the right track with its major E-mobility strategy and the introduction of the I.D. family. The I.D. R Pikes Peak and the start at the most iconic hill climb in the world offers Volkswagen the magnificent opportunity to charge the topic of E-mobility, both emotionally and from a sporting perspective.” 

The VW I.D. R Pikes Peak produces 680hp of power and 650Nm of torque and weighs only 1100 kgs. It will also use regenerative braking to recover up to 20% of the power needed for the climb, while maximising the power output of the system.

The car will be driven by three time Pikes Peak winner, Frenchman Romain Dumas.

The Pikes Peak route is an asphalt road, beginning at 2,862 metres above sea level and climbs 1,440 metres along its 20 kilometres length, with 156 corners. The 4,302 metre high summit often experiences sub-zero temperatures even in June.

 

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